Planning Enforcement

Introduction

What is Planning Enforcement?

Planning enforcement is a Council service that deals with any alleged breach of planning control.  We also monitor conditions imposed on planning permissions wherever possible to ensure that development is being undertaken in accordance with the planning permission.  In addition, we investigate complaints relating to untidy land and buildings. 

We have an adopted Enforcement Plan, which provides guidance on its planning enforcement procedures. Click on the Enforcement Plan below:

Enforcement Plan

What we can take action against

A breach of planning control is defined in section 171A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 as:

  • Carrying out development without the required planning permission; or
  • Failure to comply with any condition or limitation subject to which planning permission has been granted.

Any contravention of the limitations on, or conditions belonging to, permitted development rights, under the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015 (as amended), also constitutes a breach of planning control against which enforcement action may be taken.

Our Planning Enforcement Team also deals with certain other issues, such as:

  • Unauthorised display of advertisements
  • Unauthorised works to protected trees
  • Unauthorised work to statutorily listed buildings
  • Untidy land and buildings

 

What we cannot take action against

Certain works may not require permission, either because they do not constitute development (as expressed within Section 55 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990) or they may be defined as 'permitted development' within the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 2015. Further information on these matters can be found on the following website: http://www.planningportal.gov.uk

We can only enforce planning legislation, and therefore cannot get involved in private disputes, for example breaches of restrictive deeds or covenants, boundary disputes or rights of access. Individuals with such concerns should contact a private solicitor who may be able to pursue civil action.